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Stroke

  • What is a Stroke?

    A Stroke occurs when blood supply to the brain is disrupted. The brain arteries (blood vessels) carrying oxygen-rich blood to the brain can become blocked. This damages the part of the brain that is fed by these arteries. The signs of a Stroke vary depending on the location and size of the affected area of the brain. In a Transient Ischaemic Attack (TIA), known as Ministroke, the symptoms last up to 24 hours.

    There are 2 common types of Strokes:

    • Ischaemic Strokes occur when the arteries supplying blood to the brain are blocked due to a build-up of cholesterol deposits, called plaques, in the walls of the arteries. These plaques can rupture and lead to clot formation. The clot can then block blood flow to the brain.
    • Haemorrhagic Strokes occur when the arteries in the brain rupture due to high blood pressure and a Brain Aneurysm (balloon-like bulge in the wall of the artery).
  • Ischaemic Strokes occur when the arteries supplying blood to the brain are blocked due to a build-up of cholesterol waxy deposits, known as plaques, in the walls of the arteries. These plaques cause the narrowing of the arteries, and they can also rupture and lead to the formation of a blood clot. This can block blood flow to the brain.

    Haemorrhagic Strokes occur when the arteries in the brain rupture due to high blood pressure and a Brain Aneurysm (balloon-like bulge in the wall of the artery). Bleeding occurs from the arteries within the brain itself.

    There are different causes that increase the risk of a Stroke. The risk of suffering from a Stroke increases if you smoke and as you get older. Other conditions including High Blood Pressure, High Cholesterol Level and Diabetes Mellitus increase the risk of a Stroke. The risk of Stroke is also raised with some heart complications including irregular heartbeat, recent heart attacks, and previous Strokes or TIA.

  • You may experience any of the following:

    • Difficulty in speech
    • Difficulty in swallowing
    • Loss of balance or coordination
    • Loss of consciousness
    • Loss of memory or concentration
    • Loss or blurred vision
    • Sudden severe dizziness
    • Sudden severe headache
    • Sudden weakness and/or numbness on one side of the body
  • Your doctor will evaluate your condition and suggest the treatment that suits you best, depending on the type of stroke you have experienced:

    • Blood Thinners (e.g. Aspirin) to assist blood flow in Ischaemic Stroke patients and reduce the risk of a second stroke
    • Carotid Endarterectomy Surgery to remove a severely narrowed neck artery in the brain to reduce risk of another stroke
    • Medications and Dietary Changes to control blood pressure, cholesterol level and blood glucose level
    • Rehabilitation Treatment to help stroke patients resume normal daily activities independently through individualised physiotherapy and speech therapy programmes
    • Surgery to treat Haemorrhagic Strokes
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